Breakfast Oats and Blueberries

A simple and delicious breakfast I am inserting this recipe, which I developed gradually by some trial and error, in the hope that it will help especially families with small children.  This is a more soupy bowl of porridge, uses no milk (almond or otherwise) or sugar (only a little maple syrup or date paste to taste,) and is a lovely color of wild blueberries. You may want to have them eat before getting dressed (ounce of prevention). Ingredients:  Old-Fashioned Rolled Oats (I prefer Bob’s Red Mill Organic Extra Thick Rolled Oats), water, frozen Wyman’s Wild Blueberries Have these ingredients ready before you begin; it’s a quick process. 1 and 3/4 cup water heaping 1/2 cup oats 1 generous cup frozen blueberries To change the amount of porridge you make, the idea is to use more water than the traditional recipe says; usually it’s twice as much water as dry oats, but I more than double the water so it

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A Batch of Mushroom Gravy

Reminder: This blog for people who are eating, or who want to eat, a whole food, plant based diet, as described by Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn in the documentary “Forks Over Knives,” and his book Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease.  The food is from these categories: all vegetables except avocado, all legumes, all whole grains and products made from 100% whole grains (no added fats), and all fruits. I described in a previous post how it’s useful to make certain foods in batches, and which foods work well as batches for me. Hopefully, you will create your own batchmaking process, for foods you like which are amenable to it.  This recipe is not for every day, or even every week. It has a fair amount of salt, but it is gravy, so you’re not going to have a soup bowl of it all by itself. This recipe makes about one and one-half quarts, or six cups, and will keep for a

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so this happened…3 batches at once!

The following turns out to be more a tale of “seemed like a good idea at the time.”  It might actually work for you, but please read the Post Script at the end to learn the follow-up so you’ll be fore-warned before you try it.*** This morning I checked the fridge to see which batches I needed to do. It turned out to be rice, mushrooms which I bought yesterday, and greens (collards and Lacinato kale). I started the mushrooms and veggie broth at medium heat in a 12″ pan with sides about 3″ high and a cover, one of my set of Emeril cookware. That didn’t take long, and I put them in a quart jar and on the window sill to cool before refrigerating. While the mushrooms had their 10 minutes or so of cooking, on the other big burner I put the big 6-quart pot filled with water for the rice, and turned the heat on high.

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Batch-Cooked No-Oil Granola

Reminder: This blog for people who are eating, or who want to eat, a whole food, plant based diet, as described by Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn in the documentary “Forks Over Knives,” and his book Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease.  The food is from these categories: all vegetables except avocado, all legumes, all whole grains and products made from 100% whole grains (no added fats), and all fruits. *I described in a previous post how it’s useful to make certain foods in batches, and which foods work well as batches for me. Hopefully, you will create your own batchmaking process, for foods you like which are amenable to it. Place one 32 oz. bag of Bob’s Red Mill organic extra thick rolled oats in a big bowl.  Mix together 3/4 cup water, 1 cup real maple syrup, and 4 teaspoons vanilla extract. Pour the liquid over the oats, and mix with a folding motion using a big spoon, until all the

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Batch-Cooked Greens

Reminder: This blog for people who are eating, or who want to eat, a whole food, plant based diet, as described by Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn in the documentary “Forks Over Knives,” and his book Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease.  The food is from these categories: all vegetables except avocado, all legumes, all whole grains and products made from 100% whole grains (no added fats), and all fruits.    I described in a previous post why it’s useful to make certain foods in batches, and which foods work well as batches for me. Hopefully, you will create your own batchmaking process, for foods you like which are amenable to it. Greens Cooking greens is very straightforward .  The most time-consuming part, and the reason I like to make greens in batches, is cutting them into bite size pieces.  I am so glad at this point, that I used to make bread and from that era in my life, I have a

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Batch-Cooked Brown Rice

Reminder: This blog for people who are eating, or who want to eat, a whole food, plant based diet to prevent and/or reverse coronary artery disease, and other diseases caused by the Standard American Diet, as described by Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn in the documentary “Forks Over Knives,” and his book Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease.  The food is from these categories: all vegetables except avocado, all legumes, all whole grains and products made from 100% whole grains (no added fats), and all fruits. I described in a previous post how it’s useful to make some foods in batches, and which foods work well as batches for me. Hopefully, you will create your own batchmaking process, for foods you like which are amenable to it. My granny taught me a way to cook white rice which keeps the grains separate so they are never gummy. She didn’t measure the water, she just used plenty. She boiled it for 15 minutes, drained

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Tools

This blog is meant to help people get started on the WFPB (whole food plant based) lifestyle, as described in the Forks Over Knives documentary and recommended by Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr. In earlier posts, I talked about the idea of making lists of the foods acceptable to your family in the categories of the WFPB plan (grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits), cooking simply and having easy-to-prepare foods on-hand so that you can always default to a healthy meal. In this post I’d like to introduce some of the tools that I rely on.  You will see, in the pictures, that usefulness is way more important to me than pure appearance. I have an affinity for the “good old days”, i.e., when my Grandma was young, and rustic and natural are my colors. As I’ve said before, I’m writing all of this in the interest of sharing what I have done, but also to encourage you to try some of your

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Salad

Reminder: This blog for people who are eating, or who want to eat, a whole food, plant based diet, as described by Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn in the documentary “Forks Over Knives,” and his book Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease. As well as being vegan, we limit salt, and don’t eat any oil or refined sugar or flour, eliminating most processed foods.   The food is from these categories: all vegetables except avocado, all legumes, all whole grains and products made from 100% whole grains (no added fats), and all fruits. My standard salad ingredients are: baby kale, baby spinach, and baby arugula thinly sliced red/purple onion thinly sliced English cucumber tomato sometimes, kalamata olives For a more nutrient-rich meal, I have lately taken to adding: a can of beans, drained but not rinsed (helps make a no-oil dressing automatically) corn cut from the cob after microwaving 2 minutes and cooling a bit (I like raw corn, but my eating partner likes

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Keeping it Fresh

Debbie Meyer GreenBags Keeping vegetables fresh for a week is challenging. I have been using Debbie Meyer GreenBags, which contain in the plastic a mineral compound that absorbs ethylene gas. These greenbags are not magic. They are scientific.  Used correctly, they will do a very good job of keeping produce fresh longer.  Not for a month, no; but longer than ziplock bags, regular plastic bags, and the wrapping from the store.  Here is how they work:  ethylene gas is produced by the plant to cause ripening and from there continues to work to cause rotting. Decreasing the amount of this gas in contact with the vegetable slows the process.  Wikipedia says: Ethylene gas has been called ‘the ripening hormone’, and is scientifically known to perpetuate the ripening process of produce and plant material coming from a root system.   – Wikipedia One negative point is, of course, that the bags are plastic, but at least they are quite re-usable (I find,

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Batch, please!

Reminder: This blog for people who are eating, or who want to eat, a whole food plant based (WFPB) diet, as described by Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn in the documentary “Forks Over Knives,” and his book Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease.  For preventing/reversing heart and artery disease, higher fat containing foods are excluded. The food is from these categories: all vegetables except avocado, all legumes, all whole grains and products made from 100% whole grains (no added fats), and all fruits.   For people who do not now have heart disease, fat-containing whole food like avocado and nuts are okay, but for those with known heart disease or those who are at high risk for it, or those who want to be sure they do not get it, avocado and nuts, even though whole and natural, are eliminated due to their fat content. See the References for more sources.  For examples of foods in the major  categories, visit Dr. Michael Greger’s www.NutritionFacts.org 

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